Saturday, April 2, 2016

B is for BeeGees



When I was five years old, disco (and John Travolta) fever was in full swing!


My mother and father had divorced when I was two, and Mom had married another man not long after—a friend of her brother’s. He was a good man, and because I only saw my biological father on Sundays at my grandmother’s house, my stepfather was the man I understood to be my “dad” at that time. Young children don’t recognize the ins and outs of adult relationships, and in the 70s, people didn’t necessarily tell their children what was going on in their lives. I understood that there were some things that I shouldn’t ask about, so I didn’t. There were some things I did ask, but was told, “Don’t worry about it. That’s not for you to think about.” So I was left to worry and think about it in silence, in the confusion of my own five-year-old mind.
 
For the most part, our family seemed like other families. I didn’t know anything about divorce, none of my friends’ parents’ were divorced, and it didn’t occur to me that my stepfather was anything other than my dad—after all, I had never lived with any other man but him. It didn’t seem strange that I called him by his first name because I called my grandmother by her first name too. He did all the things that dads did. He worked, he came home, he played golf on the weekends. We played games together and he told me he loved me. And that was enough.
 
He seemed to love my mother too. I never heard or saw them fight—at least not during those early years. He was an important guy where he worked and there were many dinners and parties associated with his job, and I loved watching Mom put on her dresses and heels as they got ready to go to the country club or to some other function. I was happy then. Through my five-year-old eyes, they seemed happy too. Everyone I knew seemed happy to me at that time.
  
When Saturday Night Fever came out in the theaters and everyone was gaga over the movie, John Travolta, and the BeeGees, Mom and my stepfather took disco lessons. I remember them coming home, playing the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack on the turntable, and showing me the steps they had learned. Turns, shuffles, hands moving and fingers pointing diagonally across their bodies and then in the air. And “More than a Woman” played on the stereo…


15 comments:

  1. Interesting the way music brings back memories of moments in time.
    I didn't care for this movie, but the music was great!
    Happy A to Z day 2!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I didn't see the movie until I was in my twenties, and then I didn't care for it either.

      Delete
  2. How sweet with the memories of them showing you the disco steps they were learning. I remember seeing Saturday Night Fever at the movies and being impressed people could actually dance like that. I think little children just want to feel loved and safe and secure; I think your step dad helped accomplish that.

    betty

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I used to love to watch the dancing. Now I've transferred that to watching Dancing with the Stars. As long as I don't have to do it! Ha!

      Delete
  3. I come from a family that is very open about everything. I married into a family that never speaks abut ANYTHING that does not pertain specifically to the person involved. There are so many secrets, but it is natural to them.

    It is amazing how many times I will ask my wife a question about something I noticed at one of her family gatherings and she will say something like "I know something happened with John and his wife, but that's all I know"

    It is so unnatural for me. With my family, it's all out in the open. There are no secrets.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My family was pretty closed-lipped, and I don't know if it's a result of that, but I'm kind of the opposite. It's interesting how we often marry people with opposite personality traits.

      Delete
  4. I think their music will still be on the radio a hundred years from now. It's really timeless.

    I’m exploring different types of dreams and their meanings during the #AtoZChallenge at Stephen Tremp’s Breakthrough Blogs

    ReplyDelete
  5. I think Stephen's right. Even if disco is otherwise forgotten, the world will remember the Bee Gees.

    ReplyDelete
  6. That is such a sweet memory. I love that you're givieng your five-year-old version of the story.
    Memories are odd...

    @JazzFeathers
    The Old Shelter - Jazz Age Jazz

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Memories are odd, and you're not always certain you're remembering correctly--especially when you're remembering through a five-year-old's vision...

      Delete
  7. I heard the BeeGees at Walmart on Friday! Right after Jimmy Buffet and right before the Beatles. They have the strangest play lists. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The grocery store is the same! I hear 80s music, then 90s, then 70s. Some of the songs I don't recognize. Eclectic mix.

      Delete
  8. I am trying to imagine Disco classes :) I've seen some Disco competitions on TV in flashback programs and of course I have seen the John Travolta movies. Are white suits compulsory? ;)
    Tasha
    Tasha's Thinkings | Wittegen Press | FB3X (AC)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hahaha! I don't think they were, but they sure would have added to the mood!

      Delete